9 Books to Help You Become a Better [Graphic] Designer

9 Books to Help You Become a Better [Graphic] Designer

Whether you're a graphic designer or not, typography, logos, print, and web have become the scent of our lives. Every book, magazine, product, or website we see has had a designer behind it — some better than others.

Here are 9 of the most useful books I have read in my development as a graphic designer.

Never the Same

Never the Same

This artwork project is called "Never the Same" and simply expresses the concept of transition/change in a individual's life.

After getting in contact with some people I thought would work well as models for this project, the purchase of some green face paint (I'll explain why it was green below) and organising to borrow a white background and lights, the project was underway.

Seven Favourites: Films about the Environment

Seven Favourites: Films about the Environment

1. The Lorax (2012)

Although, this is a pretty average movie, I remember getting teary while watching the opening scene for the first time. It opens up to "Thneedville" a city that's made of plastic, and the people who live in it, like it that way! They like fake things and even manufacture their trees. They "don't want to know, where the smog and trash and chemicals go". They thank the Lord for new parking lots. "Parking Lots!" The song ends by exalting people who perpetuate the problem and sell it as success. You can watch the opening scene here:

Understanding Instagram for Brands

Understanding Instagram for Brands

After working in communications for the past five years, people often ask me what they should post on their business/nonprofits Instagram feed. So I’ve listed some of the basics here, most of these pointers also apply for Facebook and Pinterest. What gets the most likes? What time is best to post? What makes a great post?

Deadly Images

Deadly Images

Everyday of our lives we are bombarded by thousands of different images that affect us in different ways, but there’s one sort of image that is most powerful. While it terrifies us, it also comforts, while it manipulates, it’s also reassures; it is the image of death. 

We are all drawn to images of death. We build graveyards and monuments to the dead and their photographs fill our homes, but why? What makes us surround ourselves with constant reminders of death?

Self Promotion and Lies

Self Promotion and Lies

September 2004: The candidates were neck and neck in the race for the White House. George. W. Bush, would need to do something spectacular to persuade enough hearts and minds to win presidency and where better to make a statement than Madison Square Garden, NYC. His advisors understood that this event was crucial to how he was presented and they decided to exploit the power of art.

Human Body Obsession

Human Body Obsession

Images dominate our lives, they mold and define us, but there’s one type of image that captures us beyond any other. It inspires, manipulates, affects what we think of others and of ourselves; it is the form of the human body.

The human form has obsessed some of histories greatest artists. The range of differing bodies is breathtaking, yet there’s something that all great images of the human body have in common. Whatever their use, and wherever their location, the world’s most popular forms of the human body share this one thing.

Different People in Different Spaces

Different People in Different Spaces

Nearly five years ago, caught out by a snow storm with my second cousin Chanel, we took shelter in a giant glass and concrete block on Manhattan’s 5th Avenue, home to the Rockefeller Centre and more importantly the Rockefeller Centre branch of Starbucks Coffee. The mood inside the café was solemn and concentrated. Customers were sitting alone, reading newspapers and magazines or staring at grey tiles. The café’s true talent lay in the generation of anxiety. The harsh down lighting, the intermittent sounds of the coffee machine and the frenzied behaviour of the counter staff who yelled out misspelled names written on takeaway cups invited thoughts of loneliness and meaninglessness of existence in a random and violent universe. The only solution was to continue to drink what Americans think is coffee (I actually had a chilled drink) in an attempt to compensate for the discomfort brought on by the location in which one was doing so.